A Stripe is a Stripe is a Stripe

Or, is it? Fashion terminology tends to be very precise and descriptive, so I was not surprised when I discovered all the various stripes that can be described in specific terms.  What prompted my interest in stripes was my most recent addition to my casual blouse wardrobe.

There is something just so classic about navy blue and white, and a navy and white striped shirt is almost a necessity.   When I saw this Italian cotton shirt fabric on the website of Farmhouse Fabrics, I wasted no time in ordering it.

Farmhouse Fabrics has the most amazing selection of fine shirting cottons, and their service is superb!

I place stripes in the same category as checks and polka dots – timeless, varied and versatile. When I did a little exploring into the nomenclature of stripes, to confirm my thought that this was a “pencil stripe” on which I was working, I not only found this to be correct, I also was introduced to a whole descriptive world of stripes.  There are awning stripes, bayadere stripes, candy stripes, chalk stripes, hickory (or Liberty) stripes, ombre stripes, pinstripes, regimental stripes, ticking stripes, and the list goes on and on.  What designates a pencil stripe is that the background color (for example, white) between the stripes is wider than the stripes in the foreground color (navy blue), which can be as narrow as a pencil line, or bolder.

This is the fifth blouse I have made in the last year, using this simple pattern from 1972, and I would not be surprised to find myself making five more of this style.

The many alterations and refinements I have made to this pattern include 1) a shoulder adjustment to give more ease at the top of the sleeve, 2) an inverted pleat in the center back, mimicking a detail on a RTW which I particularly like, 3) fisheye darts in the back of the bodice to tame some of its fullness, 4) lengthening of the sleeve placket, making it easier to roll up the sleeves, and 5) re-cutting of the collar from pointed ends to a spread collar.

I particularly like the way this collar looks.

Every one of these blouses needs buttons, of course, and as long as I keep finding vintage buttons like these, I will keep using them.

Ultra Kraft made quality buttons. I feel so fortunate to have access to so many of their beautiful buttons on eBay and Etsy.

I tend to wear my sleeves rolled up, more often than down.

A very windy day, but the sun is shining!

How much summer sewing do I see on the horizon???

There is not much more which can be said about this blouse.  I expect to wear it casually all summer long, which is a lovely thought indeed.

8 Comments

Filed under Blouses, Buttons - choosing the right ones, Uncategorized, vintage buttons

8 responses to “A Stripe is a Stripe is a Stripe

  1. Love a tailored shirt…and in stripes, even better! Lovely!

  2. Mery

    With your changes it is the perfect casual shirt. I’ll be glad to see every iteration. That is interesting about the stripe nomenclature. I have never read or heard a couple of those terms. Happy summer!

  3. Heather Myers

    Wow, a lesson in stripes. I just got some striped fabric! Your blouse is lovely.

  4. That’s a great looking blouse, Karen, and I agree you can’t go wrong with blue and white stripes!

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