Too Late – or Too Early?

This sewing out of season is perplexing.  On the one hand, I am happy to have been able to complete this dress.  But on the other hand, the timing of its completion means it is too late in the season to even think about wearing it – or much too early.  Not that it will matter six months from now. 

After my successful use of a new sheath dress pattern earlier this winter, I was anxious to use it again.  And I just happened to have a piece of cashmere herringbone wool tucked away for such an occasion.  I had been on the hunt for a wool to coordinate with the Classic French Jacket shown, and I was quite excited when I found this selection at Farmhouse Fabrics.  The bonus was the fact that it is cashmere, and oh, so soft.  

Wool is quite possibly my favorite fabric on which to sew.  Christian Dior certainly had kind words to say about wool in his Little Dictionary of Fashion.  “Wool shares with silk the kingdom of textiles…  And like silk it has wonderful natural qualities.  Always before you cut woolen material it has to be shrunk to avoid disappointment afterward.” [I always steam wool fabric heavily before I cut into it for just this reason].  Dior continues, “Wool has the great advantage over all other materials in that it can be worked with a hot iron and molded.” (The Little Dictionary of Fashion, by Christian Dior, Abrams, New York, New York, c2007, Page 122.)  

Additionally, I have always loved the herringbone weave.  The chevron pattern in this particular fabric is achieved by the use of two contrasting colors, yellow and pumpkin, which produces the lovely and soft deep persimmon color.  

The two contrasting colors are apparent in this photo.

Making this sheath dress was very straightforward, its details identical to the sheath dress which preceded it:  lapped zipper, underlined with silk organza and lined with crepe de chine, under-stitched neckline and armscyes, and a real kick pleat.  

I chose this delicate crepe de chine for the lining. I purchased it from Emma One Sock, which has a beautiful assortment of silks suitable for linings.
Oh, how I love this kick pleat.

This jacket and skirt will be perfect for Fall – and I am delighted to have a dress to wear with my jacket which I completed two years ago.  

And now for those of you who like to see the sewing I do for my granddaughters, here are two more dresses which were definitely too early (although on time for Spring birthdays.)  Unseasonably cold Spring weather kept these dresses on their hangers apparently, but I do have pictures of them before they went on their journey across many, many miles to their final destination.

I found the fabric at Emma One Sock last Fall.  It looks and feels like Liberty Lawn but is not.  The bordered eyelet which I used for the collars is from Farmhouse Fabrics, as is the pattern, which I have used before.  (This is the last year for this pattern for my girls, as I used the [largest] size 12 for my very tall and slender eight-year-old!) 

This diagram helps to show the details of the pattern. Notice the narrow darts in the bodice, which gives such a nice degree of shaping. This is the type of detail found on well-engineered patterns, of which this is one.

The buttons are vintage Lady Washington Pearls.  The pale pink rickrack is also vintage – and 100% cotton – which makes it lay beautifully flat, molding itself with the cotton fabric.   

 

Beautiful vintage buttons like these are a good match for this timeless pattern.
Such lovely eyelet and just the perfect weight for gathering into a collar.

So quickly these weeks turn into months and then into seasons! Whatever the season from whence you are reading this, I wish you dresses which are just right!  One of these days, mine will be, too.

13 Comments

Filed under Buttons - choosing the right ones, Chanel-type jackets, Christian Dior, classic French jacket, couture construction, Eyelet, Sewing for children, Sheath dresses, Uncategorized, vintage buttons, vintage Vogue patterns from the 1960s, woolens

13 responses to “Too Late – or Too Early?

  1. You have such amazing skills and an affinity for fine fabrics. I hope you get to wear your new dress and the gorgeous jacket you made soon!

  2. So good to have a perfectly-fitting sheath pattern that construction is just about quality of sewing, not fitting and tons of decisions along the way. And how wonderful to have a gorgeous ensemble waiting for the perfect Fall event!

    • A well-fitted pattern is worth many times its weight in gold, isn’t it? And yes, I’m happy to have an outfit for Fall, which I think is the most difficult season for clothes.

  3. Wynne Bailey

    Everything is just luscious!!! From the kick pleat to the irresistible ruffles on those soon to be worn frocks for your nietas!

  4. Christine

    This dress is beautiful and the colour absolutely gorgeous. Although I do not comment on every post please know that I relish and read everyone, studying the details and lapping up the content. Your sewing is remarkable and your love of classic styles is enhanced by the use of the beautifully constructed details within vintage patterns. Thank you so much for sharing your sewing journey with us. Christine

  5. John

    I think you made that dress just in time for summer in San Francisco.

    • Well, John, you may be correct! Many years ago we were in San Francisco in early August and I almost froze to death. Then a few years later, we had a trip scheduled in October. I thought, if it’s that cold in August, it’s going to be freezing in October, so I brought all warm clothes (This was before one could check on such things on the internet!) Well, you know the rest! Mark Twain was correct, wasn’t he?

  6. Lovely as always. So much enjoy your posts.

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